Available Scanning May Lower Fatal Lung Cancer Rates

The government has started recommending lung cancer screenings for older adults between the ages of 55-70 who have smoked at least a pack of cigarettes daily for 30 years or more, as well as smokers who have smoked two packs a day for 15 years. The ultimate plan is to eliminate death in severe smokers by offering annual scans. If the plan goes into effect as expected, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force would help pave the way for more insurers to cover needed procedures such as CT scans. Dr. Michael LeFevre, a family physician at the University of Missouri said, “the evidence shows we can prevent a substantial number of lung cancer deaths by screening.” More here

Reverse Mortgage Rules May Tighten

Experts are suggesting that many older Americans should consider their home’s value as a way to help their finances during retirement years. Reverse mortgages are expected to become a vital part of many financial retirement plans over the coming years, though past and future changes to the plan may make the process slightly more difficult. The mortgage plan that allows homeowners, age 62 and up, to tap into their home equity might become more restrictive. The FHA is considering conducting financial assessments on borrowers, including revision of credit scores, to ensure the individual can afford to pay their homeowners insurance and property taxes. More here

Correlation Found Between Height and Cancer Risk

A new study has found a strong correlation between women’s height and their risk of cancer. The study consisted of over 20,900 women between the ages of 50 and 79. Researchers divided the women into five groups based on each person’s height. Based on the data gathered from the study, cancer risk increased by 13% with every 10 centimeters of height. Overall, taller women have a 13%-17% higher risk of developing breast cancer, ovarian cancer, endometrial cancer, melanoma and colon cancer. They also have a 23%-29% greater risk of developing rectum, blood, thyroid and kidney cancer. More here

Correlation Found Between Height and Cancer Risk

A new study has found a strong correlation between women’s height and their risk of cancer. The study consisted of over 20,900 women between the ages of 50 and 79. Researchers divided the women into five groups based on each person’s height. Based on the data gathered from the study, cancer risk increased by 13% with every 10 centimeters of height. Overall, taller women have a 13%-17% higher risk of developing breast cancer, ovarian cancer, endometrial cancer, melanoma and colon cancer. They also have a 23%-29% greater risk of developing rectum, blood, thyroid and kidney cancer. More here

Ginseng May Decrease Fatigue In Cancer Patients

A new study shows that ginseng supplements may help give people who have been diagnosed with cancer more energy. “The issue with cancer-related fatigue is that it can be a profound fatigue that is not relieved by sleep or rest and that it can significantly impact the ability of people to accomplish the things they are used to doing every day,” said Debra Barton, lead author of the study. The study consisted of 364 participants who suffered from cancer-related fatigue. Half of the participants took 2,000 milligrams of ginseng each day for an eight week period while the other half took placebos. Participants who took the daily dosage of ginseng reported fatigue improvement compared to those who took the placebo capsules. More here

Antioxidant In Red Grapes May Reverse Benefits Of Exercise

A new report released by Medical News Today stated that the natural antioxidant found in red grapes and red wine may reverse benefits of cardiovascular exercise in elderly men. Researchers followed 27 men around age 65 who were considered healthy. The researcher’s study required all 27 men to have intense workout sessions over an eight week period. Half of the men took resveratrol supplements, the natural antioxidant found in red grapes while the other half took a placebo. The men who took the resveratrol supplements showed reduced signs of beneficial exercise when compared to the men who took placebos. Researchers are now suggesting that too many antioxidants may harm the body. More here

Skipping Breakfast May Raise Heart Health Risks

A new study has found that skipping breakfast may be more dangerous than many Americans realize.  The study that took place out of Harvard found that men who skipped breakfast are 27% more likely to have a heart attack or coronary heart disease than men who do not skip breakfast. When the body is deprived of food for a lengthy amount of time it effects the individual’s blood pressure and cholesterol.  The study’s author, Leah Cahill said, “our bodies need to be fed food regularly in order to maintain healthy levels of blood lipids such as cholesterol, hormones such as insulin, and normal blood pressure.” More here

New Research Could Cure Blindness

According to a new study, there may be hope for people suffering from blindness. Scientists have found a way to use stem cells removed from mice embryos that have mature photoreceptors, the cells in the retina that catch light to cure blindness in mice. The photoreceptors were injected into the retinas of the blind mice to restore their sight, and in many cases the study has been a success. Britain’s Medical Research Council said embryonic stem cells “could in the future provide a potentially unlimited supply of health photo-receptors for retinal transplantations to treat blindness in humans.” More here

Medicare Pushing New Plan

Medicare is working toward a new plan that, if it goes into effect, will impact around 500,000 medical doctors who work in group practices. The new plan is a way of redirecting medicine from the current United States payment system where doctors receive the same amount of pay regardless of their patient care performance. Doctors who would be effected by the plan would be paid by the quality of their patient care, receiving penalties and bonuses based on their individual performances. Experts have suggested that the new plan would lower the number of  procedures performed and reduce overall health care costs. More here

New Knife May Detect Cancer Cells During Surgery

Researchers may have discovered a new tool to help surgeons remove all cancer cells during surgery.  According to a new report, a surgical knife that heats the body’s tissue while cutting can detect cancer in the smoke that is produced from the heated tissue. The smoke lets the surgeon know whether the tissue is cancerous or not by producing colored signals, green being health, red being cancerous, and yellow being undefined. The doctor can then send the tissue off to lab testing and get results within 30 minutes. Dr. Len Lichtenfeld, “this is a fascinating science and we need to adopt any technology that works to save patients, but first we have to be sure that it works.” More here